The 2016.12 release includes sufficient support that all teams should now be able to port all their test jobs to LAVA V2. Some changes to the test definitions may be useful to make better use of V2 and to increase the portability of the test definitions in line with QA recommendations. This presentation will showcase the current examples of how to migrate V1 MultiNode Android test jobs to V2 LXC and how to use V2 Secondary Media to support deployments on Juno. Details will also be included about the LAVA team can help test writers migrate their test jobs as the number of V2 devices increases and the number of V1 devices decreases. Details of how the Cambridge lab will migrate will also be covered as some device-types cannot support V1 and V2 simultaneously. The timetable of how V1 support will be removed during 2017 will be outlined.

Read more

Feedback and support for and by users of LAVA. Talk to us about your LAVA use cases, problems, and ideas.

Read more

Simplifying LAVA operations using Linux Containers (LXC)

Read more

Remaining tasks in the migration and next steps

Read more

Tutorial material to support getting started/evaluating LAVA v2. An end-to-end tutorial including physical bootloader device with a stand-alone installation of LAVA. Covering - device requirements, device configuration for 32- and 64-bit platforms with QEMU, ARMv7 and ARMv8 targets. An important part would be having links between the v2 documentation and the tutorial material.

Read more

The new LAVA dispatcher allows explicit control of starting/controlling guest. Walk through how to use V2 dispatcher for KVM and other VM testing and explore usage of libvirt etc. Share experiences in using V2 dispatcher in general. Plan support for migration and other advanced multinode tests.

Read more

Feedback and support for and by users of LAVA

Read more

Previous introductory tutorials on LAVA have focussed on virtual platforms. This is an end-to-end tutorial as a basis to evaluate LAVA with one or more embedded targets using U-Boot. It integrates both a physical bootloader device with a stand-alone installation of LAVA, along with a simple PDU for target power control which is based on off-the-shelf Arduino components and fully integrated with pdudaemon. It covers device requirements, device configuration for 32- and 64-bit platforms, use of lavatool, tftp, pduclient and logging via the LAVA web interface and /var.

Read more

Migrations have begun, learn how it will affect your team

Read more
Page 1 of 3123