LVC21-310: Unifying Kernel Test Reporting with KernelCI

Session Abstract

The landscape of Linux kernel testing and CI is notoriously fragmented. Systems like Linaro's LKFT, Intel's 0day, Google's Syzbot, Red Hat's CKI, and others, are each running their own tests, sending separate emails, and hosting different dashboards. As a result, developers have to cope with multiple diverse reports arriving at various stages of development cycle, and it's difficult to correlate and analyze results. The Linux Foundation's KernelCI project has been working on a CI stack and service for all to use, which is seeing increasing adoption. However, the project has also started a new effort aimed at already-established CI systems, letting participants keep their setups, but submit testing results to a common database and reporting system, using a simple, extensible protocol. The system behind the new effort is called "KCIDB" (for "KernelCI Database") and is already receiving reports from the native KernelCI tests, RedHat's CKI and Google's Syzbot, with more systems working on joining. Our aim is to develop a unified report protocol and schema, maintain an open result database, provide a single dashboard, and to send email notifications aggregating the data from all the participating systems. We want to reduce developer load, and make it easier to discover and analyze kernel testing results. Join this session to find out how far we've got, how our dashboard and email notifications look, how we're pulling this off, what the protocol and the schema is like, and how to start sending your reports or join the development.

Session Speakers

Nikolai Kondrashov

Red Hat (Sr. Software Engineer)

A self-taught software engineer with an interest in all things embedded and electronics. Born in Russia, living in Finland.

The landscape of Linux kernel testing and CI is notoriously fragmented. Systems like Linaro’s LKFT, Intel’s 0day, Google’s Syzbot, Red Hat’s CKI, and others, are each running their own tests, sending separate emails, and hosting different dashboards. As a result, developers have to cope with multiple diverse reports arriving at various stages of development cycle, and it’s difficult to correlate and analyze results. The Linux Foundation’s KernelCI project has been working on a CI stack and service for all to use, which is seeing increasing adoption. However, the project has also started a new effort aimed at already-established CI systems, letting participants keep their setups, but submit testing results to a common database and reporting system, using a simple, extensible protocol.

The system behind the new effort is called “KCIDB” (for “KernelCI Database”) and is already receiving reports from the native KernelCI tests, RedHat’s CKI and Google’s Syzbot, with more systems working on joining. Our aim is to develop a unified report protocol and schema, maintain an open result database, provide a single dashboard, and to send email notifications aggregating the data from all the participating systems. We want to reduce developer load, and make it easier to discover and analyze kernel testing results.

Join this session to find out how far we’ve got, how our dashboard and email notifications look, how we’re pulling this off, what the protocol and the schema is like, and how to start sending your reports or join the development.

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